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Winds from the North

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Copyright: 2012
Trim: 7 x 10
Pages: 504
Illustrations: 51 illus., 25 maps, 54 tables

CLOTH
978-1-60781-172-5
$70.00
Short

eBOOK
978-1-60781-992-9
$56.00

Winds from the North

Tewa Origins and Historical Anthropology

Scott G. Ortman

Anthropology / Archaeology

The “abandonment” of Mesa Verde and the formation of the Rio Grande Pueblos represent two classic events in North American prehistory. Yet, despite a century of research, no consensus has been reached on precisely how, or even if, these two events were related. In this landmark study, Scott Ortman proposes a novel and compelling solution to this problem through an investigation of the genetic, linguistic, and cultural heritage of the Tewa Pueblo people of New Mexico.

Integrating data and methods from human biology, linguistics, archaeology, and cultural anthropology, Ortman shows that a striking social transformation took place as Mesa Verde people moved to the Rio Grande, such that the resulting ancestral Tewa culture was a unique hybrid of ideas and practices from various sources. While addressing several long-standing questions in American archaeology, Winds from the North also serves as a methodological guidebook, including new approaches to integrating archaeology and language based on cognitive science research. As such, it will be of interest to researchers throughout the social and human sciences.


Scott G. Ortman is an Omidyar Fellow at the Santa Fe Institute and the Lightfoot Fellow at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center. His dissertation, which served as the basis for this book, won the Society for American Archaeology Dissertation Award in 2011.


Table of Contents:

Foreword by Porter Swentzell
Acknowledgments

1. The Puzzle of Tewa Origins
2. Inheritance and Ethnic Groups
3. Population and Movement
4. Population History of the Tewa Basin
5. Biological Variation and Tewa Ancestry
6. The Tewa Language in Kiowa-Tanoan Context
7. Homelands and Dating of Kiowa-Tanoan Subgroups
8. Place-Names, Place-Lore, and Oral Tradition
9. Metaphors, Language, and Archaeology
10. Mesa Verde Metaphors in the Tewa Language
11. Immigration, Population Movement, and Material Culture
12. The End of Mesa Verde Society
13. The Archaeology of Tewa Origins
14. Population Movement, Social Movements, and Ethnogenesis

Appendix A. Kiowa-Tanoan Reconstructions
Appendix B. Archaeological Dating of Kiowa-Tanoan Terms
Appendix C. Correlation of Site Numbers with Tewa Names
Appendix D. Correlation of Kiowa-Tanoan Speech Communities with Archaeological Complexes
References Cited
Index


Praise and Reviews:

“A very significant contribution. It will prove to be a landmark study since it shows new ways forward to the many archaeologists all over the world who are grappling with the sort of long-standing problem, concerned with questions of migration and ethnic identity, that Ortman addresses. It combines theoretical sophistication, solid methodology, and a detailed knowledge of a range of different types of evidence.”
—Stephen Shennan, Director, UCL Institute of Archaeology


Awards:

Winner of the Don D. and Catherine S. Fowler Prize 2011

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